The History of the Kimono

The History of the Kimono

The kimono is a traditional Japanese garment made of silk. It is worn over the upper body and tied around the waist. The word kimono comes from the Chinese characters for ‘coolie jacket’. In Japan, the kimono is traditionally worn on formal occasions, especially weddings and funerals.

Japan's traditional clothing, the kimono, is believed to have been invented in China during the Tang Dynasty (618–907). It was worn by women and men alike, and was made of silk and cotton. In Japan, the kimono was adopted by samurai warriors who wore it while fighting.

Introduction Kimono

The kimono is a type of robe that originated in Japan. It has been used as both a ceremonial garment and a practical one since ancient times. In modern times, the kimono is still worn by people who wish to express their cultural heritage.

In the Edo period (1603–1867),, the kimono was worn by both men and women. Men wore them under their outer garments, while women wore theirs over their everyday clothes. During the Meiji Restoration, the kimono became fashionable among Westerners because of its simplicity and elegance. In fact, the kimono has become such a common sight at weddings and other formal events that it has been nicknamed the wedding dress.

The kimono was worn by married women and widows. It was considered a sign of respectability. In addition to being a practical garment, the kimono served as a status symbol. Women who wore them were considered wealthy and well educated.

Origin  Kimono

The kimono originated in Japan during the Heian period (794–1185). During this time, the aristocracy wore silk clothing, while common people wore hemp garments. However, the aristocracy wanted to wear silk, so they began wearing cotton undergarments with silk outerwear. This was called “kimono.”

The kimono originated in Japan around the 12th century. It was worn by both men and women until the 19th century, when it began to be replaced by Western dress. In modern times, the kimono has been revived as a fashion item.

The kimono originated from the yukata, which was a loose-fitting robe worn by men and women alike. In the early 1600s, the kimono replaced the yukata as the formal dress of choice for both sexes. The kimono has been worn throughout history by people of various cultures, including the Chinese, Koreans, and Europeans.

Development

The kimono was originally made of silk, cotton, or wool. Silk was the preferred material because it was more durable than other materials. Cotton was introduced into Japan during the Edo period (1603–1868). Wool was first imported from China in the late 16th century.

During the Meiji Restoration, the kimono came into vogue again, and many young men began wearing them.

In the Edo period, the kimono was worn by both men and women. Men wore them under their outer garments, while women wore theirs over their everyday clothes.

The kimono has been around since at least the 16th century, though it wasn't until the 19th century that it began to be worn outside of the home. During the Edo Period (1603–1867) the kimono was worn primarily by married women. In 1869, Emperor Meiji ordered that the kimono become fashionable for both men and women. By the end of the Meiji Era (1868–1911), the kimono had become a symbol of national identity.

Usage

The kimono has been used throughout history as a ceremonial garment, a protective covering, and a fashion statement. In modern times, the kimono has become associated with traditional Japanese culture and is often worn at weddings and other special occasions.

 In ancient times, the kimono was worn by royalty and nobility, while common people wore looser versions called hakama. During the Edo period, the kimono came into fashion among the upper classes, who began wearing them at formal events such as weddings and funerals.

Picture via luxartasia.com

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