Why the Single Positivity Movement Is So Important Today

Why the Single Positivity Movement Is So Important Today

The single positivity movement has been gaining popularity over the past few years. But what exactly is it? And why do people like it so much?

Why the Single Positivity Movement Is So Important Today

Today's young adults are having fewer romantic relationships than previous generations. And while this trend has been going on for decades, it seems to be getting worse.

Because we've lost touch with each other.

In fact, according to a recent study by the Pew Research Center, nearly half (48 percent) of Americans ages 18 to 29 say they feel lonely at least some of the time. That's up from just one third (33 percent) who felt that way in 1990.
In fact, according to a recent study from the Pew Research Center, one in four millennials (ages 18-29) say they have never had a serious relationship. That number is higher than the percentage of people who said the same thing in 1990.

In fact, according to a recent study from the Pew Research Center, millennials are less likely to get married than any generation before them. A whopping 70 percent of people between 18 and 29 say they're single, compared to 50 percent of those aged 30 to 49 and 40 percent of those aged 50 and older.

The Rise of Social Media.

It seems like everyone has a smartphone these days. And with social media apps like Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, etc., there are now even more ways to connect with friends and family.
In fact, according to a recent study from the Pew Research Center, millennials are less likely to get married than any other generation before them. A whopping 70 percent of people between 18 and 29 say they're single, compared to 50 percent of those aged 30 to 49 and 40 percent of those aged 50 and older.

A recent study found that millennials are less likely to get married than older generations. In fact, according to Pew Research Center, only one in five millennials (ages 18-34) were married in 2016, compared to nearly half of Generation Xers (35-49).

The Decline of Face-to-Face Interactions.

In fact, according to a recent study by the Pew Research Center, only one out of five Americans say they talk to other people face-to-face at least once a week. That's down from nearly three-quarters (73%) who said the same thing in 2007.
In fact, according to a recent survey conducted by Match.com, nearly half (47 percent) of millennials say they're single because they "don't want to get into a relationship." That's compared to just one quarter of Gen Xers who said the same thing.

In fact, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Social Issues, millennials are less likely to get married than older generations. Researchers found that the number of people who got engaged between ages 18 and 24 dropped from 28 percent in 1980 to 15 percent in

Why the Single Positivity Movement Is So Important Today

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